Black Canadian Women’s Care During the Great War

The Nova Scotia Women’s History Society presents ‘Black Canadian Women’s Care During the Great War’
Tuesday, January 25, 2022, 6:30 p.m. (Atlantic), via Zoom
Dr. Hyacinth Simpson
How do you uncover the untold stories of Black women’s contributions to the Canadian war effort when they are absent from the archival and other records? That’s the focus of the first presentation in the Dialogue series, sponsored by the Nova Scotia Women’s History Society.
Hyacinth Simpson, associate professor at Ryerson University, will talk about her research and the strategies she is using to fill the gaps.

Dialogues offers a format where Dr. Simpson will be joined by a panel of experts in Black Canadian history. The event will be moderated by Dr. Claudine Bonner of the Sociology Department, Acadia University. Panelists include Sylvia Parris-Drummond, CEO of the Delmore Buddy Daye Learning Institute, and author and researcher of African Nova Scotia history Tony Colaiacovo.

Participants are encouraged to submit questions and insights ahead of the event and there will be opportunities to engage during it. Dr. Simpson also is hoping to hear from people with personal connections or knowledge of the topic.

Register at www.novascotiawomenshistory.ca/dialogues 
Dr. Simpson’s research interests focus on Caribbean, Caribbean diaspora and Black Canadian literature and cultures. An associate professor in the Department of English at Ryerson University in Toronto, her writings on Caribbean and Black Canadian fiction, poetry, cinema, and theatrical works have been published in scholarly and popular outlets. Dr. Simpson has developed a digital project on Caribbean poetry for teachers and students and she does extensive editorial work. She has served for the past nine years as editor of MaCom__è__re, an award-winning journal that publishes research on Caribbean women, and guest edited a special issue of the Journal of West Indian Literatures. Her BA and MA are from The University of West Indies (Mona, Jamaica) and she earned her PhD at York University (Toronto).