The society meets monthly from September to May inclusive to hear and to discuss individual papers about personalities, places and events integral to the history of Nova Scotia at the Public Archives of Nova Scotia. Society lectures are open to the public and are completely free. Lectures are usually followed by refreshments.
Unless otherwise indicated, our meetings are 7:00 p.m. Wednesday evenings at the Public Archives of Nova Scotia, 6016 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Please note that the December lecture is held on the second Wednesday of the month.

The New Nova Scotia: Provincial Tourism, History, and Identity, 1956-1966

Wednesday, Sept. 18, 2019, 7:00 pm, Nova Scotia Archives

Phyllis R Blakeley Memorial Lecture

Ms. Sara Hollett, Gorsebrook Research Institute

Abstract:
In 1962, the Nova Scotia Travel Bureau hired advertising firm, Dalton K. Camp & Associates (DKCA) to design and distribute tourism promotional materials across North America. This paper argues that the ideas presented in the advertising of DKCA represented a significant shift away from earlier ways of seeing identity and history in tourism promotion. These new ways of seeing reflected consumerism, as well as a more modern understanding of how history could be used to sell a destination.

Click here for a bio of Sara Hollett

The Long and Contentious Road to Women’s Suffrage in Nova Scotia

Wednesday, October 23, 2019, 7:00 pm, Nova Scotia Archives

Dr. Heidi MacDonald, University of New Brunswick

Abstract:
This presentation highlights key moments in the women’s suffrage campaign in Nova Scotia, from the 1830s through the 1960s. It will examine the important roles played by groups such as the Women’s Christian Temperance Union, the Halifax Local Council of Women, and the Nova Scotia Equal Suffrage Association, as
well as individuals such as Eliza Ritchie, Edith Archibald, and Mary Chesley.

Click here for a bio of Heidi MacDonald

 

Comprehending the Complexities of Community and Class: Integration at Graham Creighton High School

Wednesday, Nov. 20, 2019, 7:00 pm, Nova Scotia Archives

Ms. Stefanie R. Slaunwhite, PhD Candidate, University of New Brunswick

Abstract:
In 1964, when Graham Creighton High School in Cherry Brook, Nova Scotia, opened its doors for integration, many of its feeder communities were relatively rural and isolated. Racial tensions emerged, creating a legacy of conflict. Graham Creighton was the predecessor to Cole Harbour District High School, which has received considerable attention in the media related to racial tensions. While racism was undoubtedly a contributing factor to tensions between the communities, it must be considered that integration at Graham Creighton was not simply an integration of two races; rather, it was an integration of several very distinct and relatively rural communities. This article examines the nuances of community and integration, considering factors such as class, socio-economics, and geography.

Click here for a bio of Stefanie R. Slaunwhite

 

The Extraordinary Paul Laurent, Mi’kmaw Sagamow

Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019, 7:00 pm, Nova Scotia Archives

Mr. Bob Sayer

Abstract:
Laurent’s career that included being a hostage, leader of armed resistance, negotiator, peacemaker and Treaty signer makes him a towering figure. As an adolescent, he was a hostage in Boston, where his father was hanged. Head of the E’se’katik/ Mirligueche/ Lunenburg band, he became a leader of the Mi’kmaw forces based in the Baie Verte area. He is mentioned in various dispatches and minutes. Casteel, in his infamous survival story, features Laurent. Spokesman for his people, Laurent met with the Halifax Council and proposed partition in 1755. He fought in the Beausejour and other campaigns, and became prominent in the Mi’kmaw leaders’ debate and dispute about peace and war. Laurent appeared before the Halifax Council again in the French-Mi’kmaw “Scare” of 1762. He had signed the 1760 treaty that became a go-to document in later landmark provincial and Supreme Court decisions.

Click here for a bio of Bob Sayer