“Everyone is at home at a Methodist Minister’s House”: Letters of Mary (Seaman) Pike and Jennie (Seaman) Wootton 1874–1890

Wednesday, April 21, 2021, 7:00 pm (ADT), click here for the Zoom link

Laurie Glenn Norris
Abstract: Laurie Glenn Norris draws from letters discovered in the Amos Thomas Seaman House, Minudie, Nova Scotia, to examine the lives and experiences of Mary and Jennie Seaman, granddaughters of Amos “King” Seaman, both of whom married Methodist Church ministers.   

Click here for a bio of Laurie Glenn Norris

The Black Refugees and Lord Dalhousie: A Story in Seven Letters

Wednesday, May 19, 2021, 7:00 pm (AST), via Zoom

Afua Cooper Professor of Black and African Diaspora Studies, Dalhousie University 

Abstract: Afua Cooper examines the correspondence between Lieutenant Governor Dalhousie and the Earl of Bathurst, administrator of Britain’s colonies. Setting the historical context of slavery, war, and settlement, Cooper shows how the letters reveal Dalhousie’s biases. His prejudices contributed to the cruel and unjust treatment of one of Nova Scotia’s founding Black communities, people who had escaped enslavement on American plantations for freedom with the British during the War of 1812.

Click here for a bio of Afua Cooper

Oppression in the Shadows: The Mi’kmaq of Nova Scotia and the Department of Indian Affairs, 1760-1950

Wednesday, March 17, 2021, 7:00 pm (AST), via Zoom

Grace McNutt
MA, Atlantic Canadian Studies, Saint Mary’s University

Abstract: Oppression in the Shadows is a comprehensive political history that traces the history of Nova Scotia’s Department of Indian Affairs, from its earliest British colonial origins to the Centralization Policies of the 1940s. Revealed by this research is importance of region to the experience of the Mi’kmaq.

Click here for a bio of Grace McNutt

‘Why would a girl want to be educated?’ The History of Home Economics Post-Secondary Education in Nova Scotia

Wednesday, February 17, 2021, 7:00 pm (AST), via Zoom

Jennifer Brady
Registered Dietitian and Assistant Professor, Mount Saint Vincent University
Lindsey MacCallum
Scholarly Publishing Librarian, Mount Saint Vincent University

Abstract: Through their training, education, and work in communities, home economists led women’s earliest efforts to politicize domestic work and social issues that shaped the everyday lives of women and their families, such as public sanitation and education, women’s rights, food security and sustainability, and fair labour practices. Dr. Brady and Ms. MacCallum will discuss the development, experiences, and stereotypes faced by women in post-secondary home economics programs in Nova Scotia through a critical analysis of archival documents and oral history interviews of former students, staff, and faculty of those very programs.

Click here for bios of Lindsey MacCallum and Jennifer Brady

Watch the video: 

The History of the African Nova Scotian Press Tradition and its Relationship to Black Activism in Nova Scotia, 1946-1990

Wednesday, January 20, 2021, 7:00 pm (AST), via Zoom

Sawyer Carnegie MA Candidate, Atlantic Canada Studies Program, Saint Mary’s University 

Abstract: Nova Scotia has a Black Press tradition that dates back to 1915. Sawyer Carnegie will provide an overview of this tradition, while exploring connections between the Black Press and Black activism throughout the 20th century. She highlights The Clarion and publications by the Black United Front.

Click here for a bio of Sawyer Carnegie

Watch the video: 

RNSHS Public Lecture – Wednesday, 14 December 2016

December 14, 2016

“The 1921 Aerial Survey of Halifax”

Dirk Werle, ÆRDE Environmental Research

Abstract:
This illustrated talk presents the history, development, and results of aerial photography in Canada immediately after the First World War. The collections of early aerial photography in Canada and elsewhere, as well as the institutional and practical circumstances and arrangements of their creation, represent an important part of our heritage. An episode of one of the first urban surveys, carried out over Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1921, is highlighted. Using the air photos and a digitally re-assembled mosaic of that collection as a guide, a variety of features unique to the post-war urban landscape of the Halifax peninsula are analysed and compared with records of past and current land use. The air photo ensemble is placed into the historical context with thematic maps, recent air photos, and modern satellite imagery.

Click here for a bio of Dirk Werle.

The Royal Nova Scotia Historical Society Autumn 2016 Lecture Series

Click here for a downloadable programme brochure.

~~~~

September 21, 2016

“The Private Life of Jessie MacCallum, Diarist of Windsor & St. George, 1901–1910”

Julian Gwyn, Emeritus Professor of History, University of Ottawa

Phyllis R Blakeley Memorial Lecture

Abstract:
There is a growing interest among historians in diaries especially for the light they shine on the private lives of women. Largely written by those of middle class families, there is always excitement when another diary comes to light, especially by a young person. Such is the case of Jessie MacCallum (1885–1956). The diary of her early life in Windsor, Nova Scotia, and St. George, New Brunswick, covers the first decade of the last century beginning on January 1st 1901. Though she continued for the rest of her life to keep a diary, most were wantonly destroyed after her death by one of her daughters‐in‐law, who thought them too depressing. Yet what has survived (1901–08, 1910) deserves, a century later, to see the light of day.

Click here for a bio of Julian Gwyn and here for a poster for Dr. Gwyn’s talk

The 29th Annual Phyllis R. Blakeley lecture is named in memory of the late Provincial Archivist of Nova Scotia who is remembered for her contributions to local history, as a writer in her own right, and also as an archivist, a facilitator of research and a mentor, reader and advisor to many historians.

~~~~

October 19, 2016

“The Halifax Relief Commission and the Politics of the Canadian Home Front during the First World War”

Barry Cahill

Abstract:
The 6 December 1917 explosion of a munitions vessel in the Narrows of Halifax Harbour killed or fatally wounded nearly 2000 persons and injured many more. The catastrophic Halifax disaster was the most significant event affecting Canada’s home front during the Great War. Among its lesser-known aspects is the role played by Canada’s Union government, which assumed complete authority over recovery. It did this through the Halifax Relief Commission (1918–1976), established in January 1918 by Order in Council. This lecture examines the political aspects of the process that led to the establishment of the commission, taking place as it did during the bitterest federal election campaign in Canada’s history — the conscription election of 1917.

Click here for a bio of Barry Cahill.

~~~~

November 16, 2016

“Mi’kmaw Politicism and the Origins of the Micmac Community Development Program, 1900–1957”

Martha Walls, Mount Saint Vincent University

Abstract:
Between 1957 and 1970, the Extension Department of St. Francis Xavier University operated the Micmac Community Development Program (MCDP), intended to build financial and political independence in Mi’kmaw communities in northeastern Nova Scotia. Implicit in the work of MCDP was an assumption that the program would teach the Mi’kmaq political skills with which they would be better able to contest state interferences. This paper challenges this assumption as it explores how, in the decades preceding the MCDP, deeply-rooted and effective Mi’kmaw political mechanisms challenged the most egregious of colonial impositions. The MCDP was no catalyst to Mi’kmaw political action; instead it tapped into an existing and effective Mi’kmaw political network.

Click here for a bio of Martha Walls

~~~~

December 14, 2016

“The 1921 Aerial Survey of Halifax”

Dirk Werle, ÆRDE Environmental Research

Abstract:
This illustrated talk presents the history, development, and results of aerial photography in Canada immediately after the First World War. The collections of early aerial photography in Canada and elsewhere, as well as the institutional and practical circumstances and arrangements of their creation, represent an important part of our heritage. An episode of one of the first urban surveys, carried out over Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1921, is highlighted. Using the air photos and a digitally re-assembled mosaic of that collection as a guide, a variety of features unique to the post-war urban landscape of the Halifax peninsula are analysed and compared with records of past and current land use. The air photo ensemble is placed into the historical context with thematic maps, recent air photos, and modern satellite imagery.

Click here for a bio of Dirk Werle.